Saturday, 11 May 2013

Tourism chamba

Welcome to Chamba H.P.

History Of Chamba

Chamba is the only state in northern India to preserve a well-documented history from circa 500 A.D. Its high mountain ranges have given it a sheltered position and helped in preserving its centuries old relics and numerous inscriptions. The temples erected by rajas of Chamba more than a thousand years age continue to be under worship and the land grant-deeds executed on copper plates by them continue to be valid under the law.

Regarding the early history of this region it is believed that this area was at time inhabited by certain Kolian tribes,which were later, subjugated by the Khasas. The Khasas too after a time came under the sway of Audumbaras (2nd centaury B.C.). The Audmabaras had republican form of government and worshiped Shiva as their principal deity. From the Gupta period (4th Centaury A.D.) the Chamba region was under the control of Thakurs and Ranas who considered themselves superior to the low tribes of Kolis and Khasas. With the rise of Gurjara Pratiharas ((7th Centaury A.D.) the Rajput Dynasties came to power.

Tourism

Chamba the land of lord Shiva is famous for its untouched natural beauty. The district has Dalhousie, Khajjiar, Chamba Town, Pangi and Bharamour as main tourist destinations. There are five lakes, five wild life sanctuaries and countless number of temples. Chamba, is a small but attractive tourist destination of Himachal Pradesh, is known for its exquisite natural beauty. The place, located amidst picturesque and verdant valleys, is visited by tourist round the year. Sub-Himalayan range of mountains, full of diverse flora and fauna, make Chamba an exhilarating experience. Pleasing climate of the place is another factor why Chamba is one among the popular tourist destinations in the whole of India. In the following lines, we will provide you more information on the weather and climate of Chamba. The summer season in Chamba starts from the middle of April and lasts till the last week of June. Even in summers, when the plains are boiling with high temperatures, the weather here remains quite pleasing. This is the time when majority of tourist takes shelter in the place. Days are a little warm, but nights are romantic and cool. Light cotton clothes are ideal during summers. Rains in Chamba start in the month of July, when the monsoon breaks-in, and continue till late August or mid September. This is the time when the weather is misty and cloudy. During this time, the entire valley is covered in a hue of light green, with newly washed leaves shining in the glory of after-rain sunshine. The winter season in Chamba starts in the month of December and lasts till the month of February. During this season, Chamba generally remains cool and dry, but snowfall does occur at higher elevations, during these months. In the winter season, the temperature might drop to freezing point in the lower region too and snowfall may happen. Tourists should go with heavy woolen clothes during this season and enjoy snowfall.

Religious Place in Chamba

In the month of August/September the annual famous JATRA of Manimahesh commences from Laxmi-Narayana Temple in Chamba. The CHHARI is taken to the sacred lake of Manimahesh, which is one of the chief tirthas in the district. Off late people from north India and beyond have started visiting this sacred lake. The lake is situated at the height of 13,500 feet above sea level and at the base of Manimahesh Kailsah peak (18,564 feet), 92 km from Chamba, where pilgrims take holy dip. Manimahesh Kailash is a virgin peak. In 1968 an Indo-Japanese team led by Nandini Patel made an unsuccessful attempt to scale the peak. The devout attribute the failure to the divine prowesses of the holy mountain. On the margin of the lake is a small marble Shivaling called CHAUMUKHA.

Manimahesh is 27 km from Bharmour. During the mela days sufficient bus service is available upto Hadsar, 14 km from Bharmour. The pilgrimage is generally done in two stages. Between Dhanchho and Manimahesh lake, there are minor places of pilgrimage known as Bandar Ghati, Gauri Kund, Shiv Kalotri and Ganesh Ghati. The trek from Dhanchho to Manimahesh lake is difficult in patches. Just short of the lake is Gauri Kund where women take a holy dip before returning to home. The pilgrimage to Manimahesh is considered sacred like that of Amarnath, Badrinath and Rameshwarm. During the mela days several BHANDARAS are set-up for the benefit of pilgrims and meals are served free of cost. Pack animals are also available for those who do not want to carry their luggage themselves.


Bharmani Devi: Bharmani Devi, the patron Goddess of Bharmaur is 4 km from Bharmour on a steep gradient, located on a ridge among the forest and has a facinating view of Budhal valley. According to a legend Goddess was residing in the Bharmaur Chaurasi, before the advent of pilgrims. When Lord Shiva first appear in Bharmaur, the Goddess shifted her seat to the hill top known as Bharmani. It is said that Goddess passed a command to Lord Shiva that the journey to the sacred Manimahesh peak would be incomplete unless the devotees visit her place. Since then it is a ritual to visit Bharmani Devi, before the journey to Manimahesh.